Bulbous garden plants that bloom in spring

Few things warm the soul at the end of winter like the anticipation of the first flowers. After hibernating in the ground, they fearlessly open above the surface of the snow, despite the cold. As nature awakens, bulbous plants are the first to greet the gardener when the others are not even in growth yet, so you can find them in any flower garden.

Snowdrop

snowdrop

Because the flowers appear before the snow has even melted, their buds are sharpened to help overcome this obstacle. Unfortunately, some species of snowdrops are endangered in their natural habitat. For this reason, in some countries collecting wild bulbs of these plants is forbidden by law. In Russia, there is a fine for the sale of snowdrops collected in the forest.

Crocus

crocus

Another purposeful primrose flower. Breaking through the layer of snow, crocuses reveal blue, yellow, and white flowers in lush fireworks. One member of this genus, Crocus sativus, is the source of the world’s most expensive spice, saffron.

Siberian bluebell

Siberian bluebell

Although its name hints at its Siberian origin, this flower also grows in other parts of Russia and Eurasia. It is impossible to resist the rich blue hue of the flowers, which reach 2.5 cm in diameter!

Hyacinth

Hyacinth

Named after a hero of Greek mythology, the hyacinth is divine and heroic in its own way. Its delightful fragrance and vibrant shades of flowers put it a step above other bulbous primordial flowers. Hyacinths are easy to plant and bloom at home, and you don’t have to wait until spring to do it.

Birdwort

birdwort

The white flower in the shape of a six-pointed star is truly beautiful, for which it is popularly known as the star of Bethlehem in other countries. In addition to its ornamental qualities, the bird’s tail is valued for its medicinal properties.

Narcissus

Narcissus

Nothing symbolizes spring quite like fragrant white and yellow flowers towering over fresh grass. However, there are now over 25,000 registered daffodil varieties, so there’s nothing to stop you from stepping away from the cliché and choosing a more unusual color.

Tulip

Tulip

Perhaps one of the most recognizable symbols of spring and definitely one of the most popular garden flowers, which in no way makes it boring. Mass industrial cultivation has provided the tulip with a variety of varieties with over 1,800 entries.

Freesia

freesia

The delicate tubular flowers of freesia are worthy of claiming first place among fragrant spring plants. The floral, honey-citrus aroma is intense enough to envelop an entire plot. Interesting fact: Most of the white-flowered varieties smell stronger, but the red and pink freesias have the upper hand.

Iris

Iris

This genus includes over 300 species, many of which are natural hybrids. Named after the Greek goddess of the rainbow, iris comes in a huge variety of colors, with the exception of red, and is ornamental not only with exquisitely shaped flowers, but also with foliage, which often plays the role of a vertical accent in landscape design.

Allium

allium

Although the ornamental onion blooms near the end of spring, it definitely deserves attention as an extravagant contender for a place in the vase. In addition, the genus alliums give us not only flowers, but also turnips, chives and garlic-almost like a person with both intelligence and beauty.